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Japan's Earthquake Shifted Balance of the Planet

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SensGirl11

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Japan’s earthquake shifted balance of the planet

By Liz Goodwin | US News - The Lookout – Mon, 14 Mar, 2011 9:56 AM EDT





Japan's Earthquake Shifted Balance of the Planet AP110311126962

AP110311126962


Last week's devastating earthquake and tsunami in Japan has actually moved the island closer to the United States and shifted the planet's axis.
The quake caused a rift 24 kilometres below the sea floor that stretched nearly 300 kilometres long and 150 kilometres wide, according to the AP. The areas closest to the epicenter of the quake jumped a full 13 feet closer to the United States, geophysicist Ross Stein at the United States Geological Survey told The New York Times.

Japan's Earthquake Shifted Balance of the Planet Coast-shifted

coast shifted
The world's fifth-largest, 8.8 magnitude quake was caused when the Pacific tectonic plate dived under the North American plate, which shifted Eastern Japan towards North America by about 13 feet (see NASA's before and after photos at right). The quake also shifted the earth's axis by 6.5 inches, shortened the day by 1.6 microseconds, and sunk Japan downward by about two feet. As Japan's eastern coastline sunk, the tsunami's waves rolled in.

Why did the quake shorten the day? The earth's mass shifted towards the center, spurring the planet to spin a bit faster. Last year's massive 8.8 magnitude earthquake in Chile also shortened the day, but by an even smaller fraction of a second. The 2004 Sumatra quake knocked a whopping 6.8 micro-seconds off the day.
After the country's 1995 earthquake, Japan placed high-tech sensors around the country to observe even the slightest movements, which is why scientists are able to calculate the quake's impact down to the inch. "This is overwhelmingly the best-recorded great earthquake ever," Lucy Jones, chief scientist for the Multi-Hazards project at the U.S. Geological Survey, told The Boston Herald.
The tsunami's waves necessitated life-saving evacuations as far away as Chile. Fisherman off the coast of Mexico reported a banner fishing day Friday, and speculated that the tsunami knocked sealife in their direction.
(The Joban motorway near Mito after the quake: AP/Nexco East Japan. Satellite image of Japan's coast moving: NASA)

Riprock

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2012 Ahhhhh!

Cap'n Clutch

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Global warming crisis now averted?

shabbs

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Very scary stuff going on over there with the nuclear power plant and a situation that seems to keep getting worse and worse... and with the cold weather and no electricity, all of those people that are homeless from the tsunami are in dire straights...

Number Twenty Nine

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SensGirl11 wrote:Japan’s earthquake shifted balance of the planet

By Liz Goodwin | US News - The Lookout – Mon, 14 Mar, 2011 9:56 AM EDT





Japan's Earthquake Shifted Balance of the Planet AP110311126962

AP110311126962


Last week's devastating earthquake and tsunami in Japan has actually moved the island closer to the United States and shifted the planet's axis.
The quake caused a rift 24 kilometres below the sea floor that stretched nearly 300 kilometres long and 150 kilometres wide, according to the AP. The areas closest to the epicenter of the quake jumped a full 13 feet closer to the United States, geophysicist Ross Stein at the United States Geological Survey told The New York Times.

Japan's Earthquake Shifted Balance of the Planet Coast-shifted

coast shifted
The world's fifth-largest, 8.8 magnitude quake was caused when the Pacific tectonic plate dived under the North American plate, which shifted Eastern Japan towards North America by about 13 feet (see NASA's before and after photos at right). The quake also shifted the earth's axis by 6.5 inches, shortened the day by 1.6 microseconds, and sunk Japan downward by about two feet. As Japan's eastern coastline sunk, the tsunami's waves rolled in.

Why did the quake shorten the day? The earth's mass shifted towards the center, spurring the planet to spin a bit faster. Last year's massive 8.8 magnitude earthquake in Chile also shortened the day, but by an even smaller fraction of a second. The 2004 Sumatra quake knocked a whopping 6.8 micro-seconds off the day.
After the country's 1995 earthquake, Japan placed high-tech sensors around the country to observe even the slightest movements, which is why scientists are able to calculate the quake's impact down to the inch. "This is overwhelmingly the best-recorded great earthquake ever," Lucy Jones, chief scientist for the Multi-Hazards project at the U.S. Geological Survey, told The Boston Herald.
The tsunami's waves necessitated life-saving evacuations as far away as Chile. Fisherman off the coast of Mexico reported a banner fishing day Friday, and speculated that the tsunami knocked sealife in their direction.
(The Joban motorway near Mito after the quake: AP/Nexco East Japan. Satellite image of Japan's coast moving: NASA)


Garrioch making a b line for the buffet table can shift the earth's orbit farther.....

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